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Re: This info has been copied from my website: www.lapella.net
Posted by: Margaret Heart (ID *****8079) Date: November 10, 2002 at 13:58:45
In Reply to: This info has been copied from my website: www.lapella.net by Kathy LaPella of 478

CONRAD BEFORT was born April 15, 1855 in Obermunjou, Russia, and died August 12, 1914 in Munjor, Ellis County, Kansas. He married Anna Margaetha Krannewitter in Obermunjou, Russia. She was born August 10, 1856 in Obermounjou, Russia, and died August 01, 1923, in Munjor, Ellis County, Kansas.

Notes for Conrad Befort:
Came to the U.S. in 1876

More about Conrad Befort:
Burial: Munjor, Ellis County, Kansas
Immigration: October 26, Arrived in New York on SS GELLERT from Hamburg and Havre.

Notes for Anna Margaretha Kranewitter:
Burial: Munjor, Ellis County, Kansas
Immigration: October 26, 1876, Arrived in New YOrk on SS GELLERT from Hamburg and Havre.

Children of Conrad and Anna Krannewitter are:
Paulina Befort, b. Oct. 01, 1876, Obermunjou, Russia; d. March 17, 1914.
Peter Befort, b. 1878, Munjor, Ellis County, Kansas.
Clara Befort, b. July 11, 1880, Munjor, Ellis County, Kabsas; d. December 30, 1918, Ness City, Ness County, Kansas.
Anna Befort, b. Abt. 1881; m. Adam Brull, October October 01, 1901, b. Abt. 1880.
Margaret Befort, b. January 08, 1885, Munjor, Ellis County, Kansas; d. August 27, 1978, Munjor, Elllis County, Kansas.
Carl Befort, b. September 13, 1886, Munjor, Ellis County, Kansas; d. August 13, 1961.
Catherine Befort, b. Abt. 1887, Munjor, Ellis County, Kansas, m. Philip Zimmerman, b. 1883; d. November 01, 1966.
John C. Befort, b. February 18, 1890, Munjor, Ellis County, Kansas; d. June 30, 1933.
Caroline Befort, b. Abt. 1892, Munjor, Ellis County, Kansas.
Agnes Befort, b. Abt. 1893, Munjor, Ellis County, Kansas; m. Oscar Anderson
Casper Befort, b. Abt. 1895, Munjor, Ellis County, Kanas; d. infancy.
George Befort, b. September 06, 1896, Munjor, Ellis County, Kansas; d. July 12, 1897, Munjor, Ellis County, Kansas.

More about George Befort:
Burial: Munjor, Kansas.
I am researching the Brehm family who came from Germany in the late 1800's.My g-greatgrandfather's name was Joseph Jacob Brehm and his wife was Augusta Simmler.There was only one child that I khow of and his name was Carl Joseph Brehm who married Hilda Grace Wood in January 1925.Together they had eight children:1.Robert Carl 2.William Joseph 3.John Francis 4.Rita Pauline 5.Charles Ronald 6.Carol Marlene 7.Patrick David (twin) 8.Patricia Ann (twin).The Brehm family recided in Columbus,Ohio where there are still many of them living today.Married into the family were the Whitney,Dale,Mckay,Foos,Nye,Gardner families. Myself am a Nye living in Plano,Texas and have taken on the challange of building our Family Tee. If you have any info on the Brehm family that you think could be related please don't hesitate to e-mail or call or fax me.
Thank You
Merle and Darlene (Reed) Brehm started their married life on the home
farm of the Herman Brehm family on November 26, 1948. During the first year
of marriage, we had a tornado and lost several buildings and Darlene contracted
polio. Darlene and Merle had three sons - Dale, September 19, 1951; Russ,
April 21, 1953; and Doug, March 22, 1957.
Dairying was the main farm operation till 1962 when Merle went back to
college and finished his degree. He then taught math at Chapman Junior High
for several years. Later he finished his masters in counseling and was the
Junior High counselor till 1979. He had heart surgery and died December 20,
1979. The family was involved in church, community affairs, and as 4-H leaders.
Dale and Payy lived in Overland Park and have two children - Michelle and Mark.
Russ and Pat live on the former Merle Brehm farm with one son Hans. Doug and
Sharon live in Topeka with a son, Eric.
Darlene moved into Woodbine in 1981 and later married Bill Sexton in 1982.
Darlene continues to work as librarian at the Chapman Elementary School and
helps with computers. Bill sells and installs dairy equipment and computer
feeder.

Source: Woodbine, Kansas Centennial, 1887 - 1987,
Woodbine through the years pg. 66
Submitted by Darlene Sexton

Descendants of
Mathias Brehm & Maria Spörlein
0ref #: 03161 Mathias Brehm
.. +ref #: 03162 Maria Spörlein
..... 1 ref #: 00183 Joseph Brehm
......... +ref #: 00182 Eva Weidner
............ 2 ref #: 00186 Edward Pankratius Brehm
................ +ref #: 00187 Elizabeth Schmidt
................... 3 ref #: 00188 Edward Brehm
................... 3 ref #: 00189 Katherine Martha Brehm
....................... +ref #: 00190 Anthony Kobiella
................... 3 ref #: 00193 Anthony Quirine Brehm
....................... +ref #: 00194 Marion Louise Ludwig
................... 3 ref #: 00197 Christina Clara Brehm
....................... +ref #: 00198 Robert McCully
................... 3 ref #: 00199 Gilbert Carol Brehm
....................... +ref #: 03183 Dolly Christ
................... 3 ref #: 00165 Joseph Peter Brehm
....................... +ref #: 00164 Maria Ludovica Weidner
................... 3 ref #: 00343 Theodore Arthur Brehm
............ 2 ref #: 00200 Christina Kunigunda Brehm
................ +ref #: 00201 George Nickol
................... 3 ref #: 00202 Verena Kunigunda Nickol
................... 3 ref #: 00203 John Vincent Nickol
................... 3 ref #: 00204 Edward George Nickol
................... 3 ref #: 00209 John Joachim Nickol
................... 3 ref #: 00205 Rophina Nickol
....................... +ref #: 00206 Harry Walter Heidtke
............ 2 ref #: 00210 Bernard Brehm
................ +ref #: 00211 Maria Paulina Weidner
................... 3 ref #: 00212 Carolina Bernadine Brehm
....................... +ref #: 00213 Jacob Bauer, Jr.
................... 3 ref #: 00217 Ferdinand Alfred Brehm
............ 2 ref #: 00218 Maria Kunigunda Brehm
............ 2 ref #: 00219 Phillip Adam Brehm
................ +ref #: 00220 Barbara E. Leikam
................... 3 ref #: 00221 Cecilia Maria Brehm
....................... +ref #: 00222 George May
................... 3 ref #: 00223 Florence Catherine Brehm
................... 3 ref #: 00224 [1] Raymond Joseph Brehm
....................... +ref #: 03241 Nancy Janssen
................... *2nd Wife of [1] Raymond Joseph Brehm:
....................... +ref #: 03242 Mary Fisher
................... *3rd Wife of [1] Raymond Joseph Brehm:
....................... +ref #: 02985 Lorraine Bernhardt
................... 3 ref #: 00225 Dorothy Elizabeth Brehm
....................... +ref #: 01075 Robert Henry Firnbach
............ 2 ref #: 00226 Maria Mathilda Josephina Brehm
................ +ref #: 00227 John Stephan
................... 3 ref #: 00228 Benedict Stephan
..... 1 ref #: 00031 Mary Margaret Brehm
......... +ref #: 00029 Johann Weidner
............ 2 ref #: 01289 Martin Joseph Weidner
................ +ref #: 01290 Josephine Beller
................... 3 ref #: 01291 William Weidner
................... 3 ref #: 01292 Winifred Weidner
................... 3 ref #: 01293 Valeria Weidner
....................... +ref #: 01300 ? Le Cleerq
................... 3 ref #: 01294 Hildegard Weidner
............ 2 ref #: 01295 Theresia Rosa Weidner
................ +ref #: 01296 Andrew George Horcher
................... 3 ref #: 01297 Theodore Charles Horcher
....................... +ref #: 01298 Vera Hans
................... 3 ref #: 01299 Ruth Margaret Horcher
....................... +ref #: 01301 Joseph Duthorn
................... 3 ref #: 01305 Irene K. Horcher
................... 3 ref #: 01306 Elizabeth Anastasia Horcher
................... 3 ref #: 01307 Regina Albertina Horcher
............ 2 ref #: 01308 August John Weidner
............ 2 ref #: 01309 Christine Kunigunda Weidner
............ 2 ref #: 01310 Charles Joseph Weidner
................ +ref #: 01311 Katherine Maria Schmidt
................... 3 ref #: 01312 Henry Leonard Weidner
....................... +ref #: 01313 Irene Boness
................... 3 ref #: 01317 Joseph Weidner
....................... +ref #: 01318 Etta North
................... 3 ref #: 01319 Maria Regina Weidner
................... 3 ref #: 01320 Edwin Albinus Weidner
....................... +ref #: 01321 Agnes M. Thoma
................... 3 ref #: 01090 Richard August Weidner
....................... +ref #: 01089 Rose Caroline Raupp
................... 3 ref #: 01325 Genevieve Weidner
....................... +ref #: 01326 Rudy Lathory
............ 2 ref #: 01327 Joseph Weidner
................ +ref #: 01328 Barbara Obrest
................... 3 ref #: 01329 Clarence Weidner
....................... +ref #: 01330 Barbara Thomas
................... 3 ref #: 01336 William Weidner
....................... +ref #: 01337 Dorothy Fredricks
................... 3 ref #: 01340 Margaret Weidner
....................... +ref #: 01341 William Barky
................... 3 ref #: 01344 Joseph Weidner, Jr.
................... 3 ref #: 03381 Mary Weidner
............ 2 ref #: 03379 Margaret Weidner
............ 2 ref #: 01345 Henry George Weidner
................ +ref #: 01346 Emma Barbara Firnbach
................... 3 ref #: 01347 Urban Andreas Weidner
....................... +ref #: 01348 Bernice Thorpe
................... 3 ref #: 01351 Erich Weidner
....................... +ref #: 01352 Dolores Thommes
................... 3 ref #: 01355 Roy Weidner
....................... +ref #: 01356 Annonette Toussaiant
................... 3 ref #: 01357 Verena Maria Weidner
....................... +ref #: 01358 Leroy Huebner
................... 3 ref #: 01361 Rudolph William Mark Weidner
................... 3 ref #: 01362 Norman Oscar Weidner
....................... +ref #: 01363 Geraldine Beierwaltes
............ 2 ref #: 01364 Maria Elizabeth Bernadina Weidner
............ 2 ref #: 01365 Engelbert Weidner
................ +ref #: 01366 Katherine Oberst
................... 3 ref #: 01367 Dorothy Weidner
................... 3 ref #: 01368 Norbert P. Weidner
................... 3 ref #: 01369 Ferdinand J. Weidner
....................... +ref #: 01370 Marie Catherine Emmerich
................... 3 ref #: 01371 Catherine Weidner
....................... +ref #: 01372 George Folz
................... 3 ref #: 01374 Vincent Clarence Weidner
....................... +ref #: 02169 Elsie Elanore Klages
............ 2 ref #: 01375 Eva Joanna Regina Weidner
................ +ref #: 01376 Otto Michael Firnbach
................... 3 ref #: 01377 [2] Margaret M. Firnbach
....................... +ref #: 01378 Kenneth Molkup
................... *2nd Husband of [2] Margaret M. Firnbach:
....................... +ref #: 06554 Adolph Lepianka
................... 3 ref #: 01380 Mary Elizabeth Firnbach
....................... +ref #: 01381 John Brusca
............ 2 ref #: 01384 William Leo Weidner
................ +ref #: 01385 Marie Schoemdelmelka
................... 3 ref #: 01386 Delmar Weidner
............ 2 ref #: 01387 Cecilia Maria Paulina Weidner
..... 1 ref #: 01642 George Brehm
......... +ref #: 01643 Maria Dittrich
............ 2 ref #: 01644 Anna Gertrude Brehm
................ +ref #: 01645 Louis Nowakowske
................... 3 ref #: 01646 George Nowakowske
................... 3 ref #: 01647 Girard Nowakowske
................... 3 ref #: 01648 Louis Nowakowske
................... 3 ref #: 01649 Barbara Nowakowske
....................... +ref #: 03331 Mark Vogel
................... 3 ref #: 01650 Cyril Nowakowske
............ 2 ref #: 01651 Louise Catherine Brehm
................ +ref #: 01652 William Vogel
............ 2 ref #: 01653 Frances Ottilia Brehm
..... 1 ref #: 03333 Theresa Brehm
......... +ref #: 03334 Adolph Boedeker
............ 2 ref #: 03335 Clara Boedeker
............ 2 ref #: 03336 Ella Boedeker
............ 2 ref #: 03337 Fredricka Boedeker
................ +ref #: 03338 ? Monnett
............ 2 ref #: 03339 August Boedeker
............ 2 ref #: 03340 Theresa Boedeker
..... 1 ref #: 03341 Barbara Brehm
..... 1 ref #: 03343 Mary Brehm
......... +ref #: 03342 Joseph Stahl
............ 2 ref #: 03344 Maria Stahl
................ +ref #: 03345 Michael Fredrick Wagner
............ 2 ref #: 03346 Francisca Emilia Stahl
................ +ref #: 03347 Albert Martin Wagner
............ 2 ref #: 01806 Albert John Joseph Stahl
................ +ref #: 01805 Sophie Otillia Weidner
................... 3 ref #: 01807 Irving Michael Stahl
....................... +ref #: 01808 Lamina Maria Radke
................... 3 ref #: 01813 Anna Loretta Stahl
................... 3 ref #: 01814 Marvin Albert Stahl
................... 3 ref #: 01815 Willard Joseph Raymond Stahl
....................... +ref #: 06584 Phylis Gauger
..... 1 ref #: 03354 Christine Brehm
......... +ref #: 03355 Bernard Ketteler
............ 2 ref #: 03356 Marge Ketteler
................ +ref #: 03357 ? Probst
............ 2 ref #: 03358 Alex Ketteler
............ 2 ref #: 03359 Leo Ketteler
............ 2 ref #: 03360 Clara Ketteler
............ 2 ref #: 03361 Alma Ketteler
................ +ref #: 03362 ? Schnueder
............ 2 ref #: 03363 Frank Ketteler
............ 2 ref #: 03364 Severina Ketteler
............ 2 ref #: 03365 Otto Ketteler
............ 2 ref #: 03366 Elanore Ketteler
................ +ref #: 03367 ? Mausel
..... 1 ref #: 03368 John Brehm
......... +ref #: 03380 Elizabeth Spörlein
..... 1 ref #: 03369 Engelbert Brehm
..... 1 ref #: 03370 Katherine Brehm
......... +ref #: 03371 ? Lunz
............ 2 ref #: 03372 Joseph Lunz
............ 2 ref #: 03373 John Lunz
............ 2 ref #: 03374 Mary Lunz
............ 2 ref #: 03375 Sebastian Lunz
............ 2 ref #: 03376 Ann Lunz
................ +ref #: 03377 ? McDonough
Husband: Steen, Ellis Morton

Born: 26 May 1879 Daviess County, Indiana
Marriage: 30 Jun 1937

Died: Apr 1954 Washington, Indiana
Father: Steen, John Franklin (2 Nov 1850 - 24 Dec 1917)

Mother: Lock, Mary Catherine (26 Nov 1854 - 26 May 1911)

Other Spouses Dennie Buelah Dale,
Wife: Brehm, Ruth M

Born: 4 May 1901
Died:
Father: Brehm, Frederick William (15 Nov 1866 - )

Mother: Wallensiek, Mary Augusta (5 Jan 1873 - 5 Dec 1925)

Our forefathers who left Germany to go to Russia to make a better life for themselves and their children. It is dedicated as well to our brave forefathers who left Russia to make a better life for themselves and their children in the United States. It is especially dedicated to those of our relatives who stayed in Russia and endurred over fifty years exiled in prison work camps for their crime of being of German ancestry.

Forword
Many books and papers about other Volga German families and their descendants, have been published over the last fifty years, and are treasured documents for not only the serious researcher, but also those with a passing interest as well. This book is one the descendants of one Befort family that left Germany to go to Russia.

While every effort has been made in this compilation to provide accurate and complete information, endeavors to aquire additional facts and details from both the United States and European sources continue. Any ommission of person (s), places, or events that deserve inclusion berein is purely unintentional.

This is the story of a Volga-German family named Krannawitter. In the chapters which follow, I have attempted to trace the development of the family from the 1766 migration to Russia, through the four-genreation sojourn along the Volga River, to migration to America.
While gathering geneological information for this book, I have had the opportunity to contact many members of this family living in different parts of the U.S., in canada, and in Argentina. I have also corresponded with members of this family who remained in Russia. During my research, i have come across six different ways of spelling the surname among my relatives; Krannewitter, as spelled in the original Russian censuses; Krannawitter, as spelled by members of my own family; Kronewitter, as spelled by cousins descended from my great-uncle; Kronewitter, as spelled by by cousins in Colorado. Kronewitt; as spelled by relatives in Canada; and Kranewitter, as spelled by relatives in Argentina and by relatives who stayed in Russia. Members of all these families have contributed information making this book possible. Biographical sketches detail the lives of selected people from these different families and areas.
Attention is also devoted to the hundreds of unrelated American and European families who bear surnames similar to Krannawitter--with such spellings as Kronawitter, Kronawetter, Kranebitter, Cronenwett, Kronebitter, Kronenwett, Kronewetter, and Kranawetter.
Finally, maps and photographs provide a visual representation of the places and people referred to. I certainly enjoyed putting it together

This book is the end result of years of research into the origin and dispereal of the Krannawitter family. This INTRODUCTION contains a brief description of the twelve chapters and two final sections of this book.
Within each chapter, in the even that any information was obtained from published material or from correspondence with official agencies, the particular sourse is cited. Much of the data used in this geneological report was also taken from personal letters and family records; these sources, too, are duly cited. All of the sources used to compile this book, including those not speciifically cited within the chapters, aare recorded in the bibliographic list at the end of the book.
The author wishes to express his sincere graditutde to all the people who made this report possible. Any ommissions or mistakes are unintentional. Special care has been given to citing all the people responsible for the compilation of this work.
The members of the Krannawitter, Kronewitter/Kronwitter/Kronewitt/Kranewitter families that came to America from the Volga-German colonies in Russia were among thousands of ethnic Germans from Russia who emigrated in search of freedom from 1875 up to the time of the Russian Revolution. The variant spellings of the Krannawitter surname evolved as family members who had moved to different parts of North and South America graadually lost contact with each other.
In the earliest Russian records, the name was spelled Krannawitter. All the American spellings that eventually developed differed slightly from this original version. Later in this introduction, more attention will be given to the subject of the dispersal of this family and different spellings that ensued. For the make of simplicity, in this report the surname will be referred to generically as Krannawitter unless a specific family with an alternative spelling is being discussed.
Evidence seems to indicate, although not incontrovertibly, that the Krannawitter family that migrated to the Volga colonies of Russia originated in Wiesbach, a small German village in lowerer Bavaria situated about 50 miles northeast of Munich. (See figure 29.) Chapter one of this book, WIESBACH, LOWER BAVARIA< GERMANY; THE PROBABLE PLACE OF ORIGIN OF THE VOLGA-GERMAN IMMIGRANT JOHANNES KRANNEWITTER (1731-EA. 1782), ANALYZES THE RESEARCH that led to this tentaative conclusion (Pleve 1998).

According to records contained in Catholic parish archives in Germany, Adam Kronawitter and his wife Anna _______-were parents of Michael Gronawitter (the surname was spelled differently even in the same baptisimal entry.), baptised 3 May, 1731, at the church serving the parish of Obertrennbach, where Weisbach was located. The entry stated that Adam Kronawitter was a dragoneer in the army (presumably the Bavaarian army) and had been stationed at Mitterfels, a town about 40 miles north of Weisbach and about 20 miles east of the city of Regensburg (Mai (Dr. Paul) 1998). the Catholic archives referred to aare the only souce of records fo so early date in Germany.
Johannes Krannewitter was the name of the man who migrated from Germany to Russia, as listed in the roster of the original settlers of the Volga-German colony of Obermonjou, where he settled in 1767. (See figure 30.) Upon arrival at the colony on August, 1767, he stated that he was 36 years of age, that he was a Catholic, that he was from Weisbach (Germany), and that he was a baker by trade. Anna _______-, his wife, was 29 years of age (Pleve 1998).
The author corresponded with the directors of the diocesan archives that house Catholic parish records wre the only records kept in these towns in the early years. The only Weisbach that hadd records of any Krannawitter (or any other similar spelling of that surname) families living in close proximity was the village mentioned above.
Michael Gronawitter, baptised in 1731--according to records in Weisbach, Lower Bavaria--would have been 36 in 1767, as Johannes Krannewitter indicated that he was when he settled in Obermonjou in 1767. In German naming practice at the time of Johannes Krannewitter's migration, men were often given two names and would refer to themselves in official documents by either or both of these names. It is highly plausible that Johannes and Michael were one and the same. Johannes Michael was a common given-name combination. Since the Catholic church in Obermonjou available for that early a date, it is impossible to verify this claim using those sources (Pleve 1999). Only circumstantial evidence can be used to provide further support for the assumption that Johannes and Michael were the same person. Particularly
relevant is the fact that the information about Johannes Krannewiter's place or origin was extracted from the list of the first settlers of Obermonjou (PLeve 1998).

item

The place of origin was extracted from the list of the first settlers of Obermonjou (Pleve 1998). The place of origin named in this source is by and large more speciifc and more reliable than that listed in the other principal source of information about the early German migrants to the Volga colonies; the Ivan Kuhlberg records, which were ship passenger lists prepared in 1766 when the first-settlers list is usually the place of birth, which makes it easier to find a connection in Germany (Schmidt 1998).
At any rate, thanks to early Russian census records an unbroken line can be traced from Johannes and Anna Krannewitter to most of the families descended from them. Dr. Igor Pleve, who is on the faculty of Saratov State University and is an expert in Volga-German research, and the American Historical Society of Germans from Russia (AHSGR) based in Lincoln, Nebraska, have been instrumental in providing information drawn from these early censuses. The AHSGR has published 1798 census data for Obermonjou and for the other Volga-German colonies (Rye 1995; Pleve 1998). Chapter Two of this book, EARLY VOLGA-GERMAN RECORDS USED IN THIS GENEOLOGICAL REPORT, focuses on four early sources that were referred to during the research process; and it summarizes the information taken from these records. Later censuses, or "revision lists" of earlier enumerations, were taken in the years 1816, 1834, and 1850 (Mai (Brent) 1998; Pleve 1998; Rye 1995; Leiker 1999; Rupp 1999). From this Russian data and from death, census, church, family, and other records of family members who later moved to America, pedigree charts have been made fro three related Obermonjou families; Krannawitter, Dechant, and Brull; these charts are included in Chapter Two (See figures 1, 2, and 3).
A genealogical profile of Krannawitter families living in the U.S., Canada, Argentina, Russia, Kazakhstan, and Germany who aare descended from Johannes and Anna Elizabeta Krannewitter is contained in CHAPTER THREE,,AN ELEVEN-GENERATION REGISTER OF SOME OF THE DESCENDANTS OF JOHANNES AND ANNA ELISABETA (SATTLER) KRANNEWITTER. This chapter consists of a computer-generated report of eleven generations. All the sources used to compile this data aare included in the bibliographic list. Many of the families are traced through only a few generations.
Before discussing any more of the content of the book, the author would like to present an abbreviated history of the Volga_german colonies and in this way provide a historical backdrop for the benefit of the reader. The information which follows was taken from two excellent books written about the Volga-German colonies: Wir Wollen Deutsche Bleiben, by George J. Walters, 1982; and The German Colonies on the Lower Volga, by Gottlieb Beratz, 1914, translated by Leona W. Pfeifer, LaVern J. Rippley, and Dona Reeves-Marquardt, edited by Adam Giesinger, all of whom worked in cooperation with the AHSGR (Walters 1982; Beratz 1914).
The ancestors of the Volga Germans were among an estimated 27, 000 Western Europeans, primarily Germans, who migrated to Russia from 1764 to 1767 upon the invitation of th Russian empress Catherine II, better known aas Catherine the Great. The Catholic settlement of Obermonjou, which was the home of all the Krannawitter families that later migrated to America, was one of 104 Mother Colonies--32 Catholic and 72 Protestant--established by these immigrants on both sides of the lower Volga River.

Obermonjou was one of 27 colonies founded in 1766 and 1767 by Chevailer Caneau de Beauregard, a native of Switzerland who directed a French company employed by the Russian government to recruit colonists. The subdivision in which these 27 colonies were located was called the Fief de Catherine. Obermonjou, which was named for the French recruiting agent Otto de Monjou, was founded 5 March, 1767, by 82 families, including 160 males and 139 females, for a total of 299 (Stumpp 1978). Obermonjou was located about 40 miles northeast of the city of Sartov and was situated on the east side, or Wiesenseite (meadow side), of the Volga River. (See figure 30.) The west side of the Volga River was known as the Bergseite (hilly side) (Walters 1982; Beratz 1914).
To temp the war-weary farmers, merchants, artisans, and soldiers of Germany and other European countries, Catherine the Great--a german herself--issued official edicts that offered free communal land, paid travel expenses, freedom of religion (as long as the people were Christians), freedom of self-government, and the opportunity to carry on one's particulat traade (Walters 1982; Beratz 1914).
Upon arrival in Oranienbaum, a seaport near St. Petersburg, Russia, the colonists--after a difficult land and sea journey from recruiting points in Germany--received the first of many setbacks they would encounter. They were informed by the Russian Commissar Ivan Kuhlberg, who served as Catherine's official spokesman to the settlers, that they would all have to become farmers, regardless of Catherine and her immediate successors. These pan-Slavic circles had grown suspicious and envious of the prosperous Volga Germans, who lost the liberty to rule themselves, to instruct their children in the German language, and to avoid conscription into the Russian army. The abrogation of these concessions prompted the Volga Germans to take advantage of an escape clause in the second of Catherine's two manifestos of invitations: the right to quit Russia at any time after paying a tax on profits made in the empire. One of the destinations this time, after careful consideration and exploration by a group of scouts appointed by the colonists, was North America--specifically the fertile Great Plains of the U.S. Others chose to migrate to South America, where they settled in Brazil and Argentina (Walters 1982).
Typical of the movement was the settlement of Ellis and Rush counties in Kansas, where between three and four thousand Catholic Volga Germans eventually located. They founded the settlements of Herzog (Victoria), Munjor, Katherinestadt, (Catherine), Liebenthal, Schoenchen, and Pfeifer (Walters 1982).
Several Krannawitter families and individuals from Obermonjou are known to have migrated to America. The following paragraphs detail the dates of their arrivals, their ultimate destinations, and the different spellings of the surname they utilized. The number in superscript between the immigrant's given name and surname indicate the number of his or her generation of descent from Johannes Krannewitter, the original Volga-German settler. The paretheses after the immigrant's surname enclose a complete list of the names and generation numbers of each of his or her
Krannawitter ancestors leading up to Johannes Krannewitter. This is same pattern will be used throughout this book--except when the type must be single-spaced, in which event brackets will enclose the number of the generation of descent. Chapter Three, entitled AN ELEVEN-GENERATION REGISTER OF SOME OF THE DESCENDANTS OF JAHANNES KRANNEWITTER AND ANNA ELIZABETA SATTLER, contains a complete description of each Krannawitter immigrant's family.
Brothers Johannes and Raymond Krannawitter both move to the U.S. albeit at different times. Johannes came to Ellis County, Kansasas single man in 1876. One of the original settlers of Munjor, Kansas, he later married Helen Leiker. Raymond came to Ellis county 1901 with his second wife Mary Krapp, son John Krannawitter (who was Raymond's son by his first wife Maria Catherine Dechant--John is the author's grandfather), and daughters Julia and Rosa Kronewitter (who were the oldest children of Raymond and Mary). Later, another daughter, Katherine Kronewitter, and a son, Joseph Kronewitter, were born in the U.S. Joseph and his sisters spelled their name Kronewitter, as do their descendants today. Raymond's brother Johannes and his family migrated to the U.S. in 1901, they spent a short time in Ellis County, Kansas; then they, too, moved to New Mexica where Raymond worked with his brother. In 1907, Raymond and his family moved back to Ellis County and settled near Schoenchen. Many years later, one of Johannes' sons, Michael Krannawitter, also moved back to Ellis County and settled near Severin, located about five miles northwest of Catherine.

Stories
The rest of Johannes' children remained in New Mexico, but he and his wife also eventually returned to Ellis County where they settled in Hays, the county seat (Pleve 1998; Krannawitter (Michael J. 1993.)
Margareta Krannawitter, widow of Johann Leiker, moved to Munjor, Ellis County, with her children in 1876. Her son, Peter Leiker, was one of the five scouts sent in 1874 by the Caatholic Volga-German colonies to explore the possibilities of establishing settlements in the central plains of the U.S. (Pleve 1998; Leiker (Victor C. 1976.)
Magdalena Younger, widow of Franz Krannewitter, accompanied her daughter Barbara Krannewitter and Barbara's husband John Pfannnensteil to Munjor, Kansas, by 1880. Franz was the brother of Johannes Krannewitter who was the father of Johannes and Raymond Krannawitter, discussed above. (Pleve 1998; Meyer 1976).
Maria Elizabeth Krannewitter (Kronewitter) was the sister of Franz and Johannes mentioned in the paragraph above. She and her husband JOhn Rohr also moved to Munjor by 1880 (Pleve 1998; Meyer 1976).
In 1878, brothers Michael and Joseph Kranewitter--who were brothers of the U.S. immigrants Johannes and Raymond Krannawitter discussed above--migrated to the province of Entre Rios, Argentina, with their adoptive parents Joseph and Catalina (Unrein) Wendler. They were among the founders of the Volga-German settlement of Marienthal (Valle Maria), located about 25 miles south of the city of Parana (Wendler 1990; Kranewitter (Vicente) 1990). Raphael
Kranewitter--who was probably the brother of Johannes, Raymond, MIchael, and Joseph--remained in Russia. His descendents are profiled in Chapter five (Dreher Katharina) 1995).
Adam Kranewitter and his family moved to Valle Maria, Argentina, in 1878. They were also among the founders of that settlement (Pleve 1998; Kranewitter (Vincente) 1990.
Johannes "Weisse" Kranewitter and his wife Margaretha C. Leiker migrated to Valle Maria in 1880. John Conrad Kranewitter and his family also migrated to Brazil in 1877 and then to Valle Maria in 1880 (PLeve 1998; Kranewitter (Vicente 1990).
Raymond Kronewitt moved first to Ellis County, Kansas, in 1902, and later to the Peace River valley of Alberta, Canada, in 1913. Raymond's aunt Anna Maria Krannewitter and her husband John Boos and their children migrated to Ellis County in 1892. Raymond Kronewitt's first cousins Peter and Frank Kronwitter moved to the U.S.--Peter in 1903 and Frank in 1904. Peter and his wife Dorothea Boos returned to Russia in 1924 and died there. One of their daughters Anna Kron (e)witter and her husband John Dechant moved to the Peace River valley of Alberta in 1915. Peter's brother Frank Kronwitter and his family settled in Pueblo, Colorado. (See Chapter Five). (Pleve 1998; Krapp; 1986; Dechant 1987).
Present-day descendants of the five Krannawitter/Kron(e)witter families who migrated to North America, the six Kranewitter familes who migrated to South America, and two of the Kranewitter families stayed in Russia are listed in Chapters Four and Five.
Chapter four, current listings of related Volga-German families and individuals, as well as the many U.S. families that have variant spellings of the surname and do not have an obvious connection to the Volga-German families. The families are ranked according to the frequency of appearance of each particular spelling in the U.S. telephone diretories or in other U.S. indexes. Also discussed are the areas in the U.S. where there are high concentrations of these families. Various immigration records, the social security Death index, and listings found on the internet were also used to compile this data.
Chapter five, A FOCUS On RELATED KRONEWITT FAMILIES LIVING IN CANADA AND ON RELATED KRAANEWITTER FAMILIES LIVING IN ARGENTINA, RUSSIA, KAZAKHSTAN, AND GERMANY, provides up-to-date listings of the Kronewitt families in Canada, Kranewitter families in Argentina, and Kranewitter families who chose to remain in what later became the Soviet Union. The information for the American Kronewitt and Kranewitter descendents came from Internet directories. The information for the Russian Kranewitter descendants came from private correspondence. These Russian families underwent terrible ordeals to attain their present positions. Between 1876 and 1914, around 200,000 Volga Germans migrated to Siberia, the U.S. Canada, and countries in South America.

The number of Volga Germans that remained in what later became the Volga German Republic increased to around 600,000 in 1914. In 1912, the population of Obermonjou had reached 2,882. By 1926, it had fallen to 2,157, due largely to a deadly famine that had swept through the Volga colonies, which were already devastated by crop failurees in 1920 and 1921. The previous disastrous effects of WWI and the resulting civil strife and anti-German sentiment added to the misfortunes of the German settlers. The tyrannical policies of Josef Stalin--brutally enforced by his communist cohorts, another widespread famine in 1932, the con scription of the young men of the towns into the Soviet army, and the banishment of property holders to prison camps all contributed to the steady decline of Obermonjou and the other Voga-German towns. The final blow came during WWII when the German army was approaching the Volga region. Stalin, fearing collaboration of the Volga Germans with the enemy, ordered the banishment of the entire population in August, 1941, along with the abrogation of the Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic of the Volga Germans, which had been established in 1924. Some 390,000 Volga Germans, which had been established in 1924. Some 390,000 Volga Germans were resettled in Siberia and Kazashstan (Walters 1982; Beratz 1914).
Among those people resettled wwere several Kranewitter families. The author has contacted two descendants of these families: Vladimir Kranewitter and Katherine Dreher. Their story and the story of other relatives still living in Russia and Kazakhstan aare recounted in Chapter 5, A FOCUS ON RELATED KRONEWITT FAMILIES LIVING IN CANADA AND ON RELATED KRANEWITTER FAMILIES LIVING IN ARGENTINA, RUSSIA, KAZAKHSTAN, AND GERMANY. Now that the Russian Government has eased restrictions on the Geman minority, more are trickling back to the former Volga German Republic near Savator. However, because the Russian economic situation is so bleak at the present time, many others are filling out the countless forms and submitting the endless documents necessary to emigrate to Germany. Katharina Dreher, mentioned above, and her family have joined the thousands of Volga Gemans who have returned to their motherland. (See figures 8-14.)
Chapter Six, OTHER FAMILIES WITH VARIANT SPELLINGS OF THE KRANNAWITTER SURNAME LIVING IN EURAOPE AND SOUTH AMERICA, contains statistics on the hundreds of families scatttered throughout Germany, Austria, Italy, Switxerland, France, Spain, Belgium, Luxemboug, and Paraguay who have different versions of the surname Krannawitter. These families and individuals are not obviously related to the Krannewitter couple that settled in Obermonjou, Russia, in 1767, Any concentration of families with a similar spelling of the surname is noted. Sources for this information were also telephone directories found on the internet. (See figures 15-21.)
ChaPTER sEVEN, A TRIBUTE TO WILFRED W. KRANNAWITTER (1924-1970), RADIOMAN SECOND CLASS, U.S.S. SARASOTA APA 204, WWII, IS A MEMORIAL to the author's father. Wilfred W. ("Willie") Krannawitter served in the south Pacific at the end of WWII. His ship, the Attacik Transport U.S.S. Sarasota APA 204, took part in the battle of WWII-- the Battle of Okinawa. This chapter includes an itineray of all the ports of call and war-time duties of the Sarasota. Also included are photographs, a history of the Sarasota's post-war activities, and an artistic rendition of the ship itself. After the war, Wilfred bought land and went into farming and stock raising. He later fought a personal battle against the neurologic disease Guillain-Barre Syndrome for 17 years before it claimed his life in 1970. (See figures 22-24).
CHAPTER EIGHT, BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF TWELVE NOTED KRANNAWITTER, KRANEWITTER, KRONEWITT, AND KRONA WITTER INDIVIDUALS IN THE U.S., CANADA, ARGENTINA, RUSSIA, AUSTRIA, GERMANY, AND AUSTRIA, contains information about the lives of eight notable Volga-German relatives: three descended from the Kronewitt family that migrated to Argentina, and one descended from one of the Kranewitter families that remained in Russia. Four unrelated but equally distinguished individuals are also treated: three with the surname Kranewitter and one with the surname Kroneawitter.
Chapter Nine, ETYMOLOGY REFERENCES AND GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATIONS IN EURAOPE AND THE U.S. THAT RELATE TO THE SURNAME KRANNAWITTER, includes entries taken from three etymological dictionaries that deal with surnames. Four geographical locations are also described: the hamlet of Kanawitt in Upper Bavaria, Germany: the mountain peak Kranabitsattel in the Hollengebirge mountains of Upper Austria, Austria; the airport Innsbruck-Kranebitten near Innsbruck, Tirol, Austria, and Kronenwetter Township in Narathon County, Wisconsin. (See figures 25-27.)
Chapter Ten, THE KRANEWITTER COAT-OF-ARMS, AWARDED TO THE TYROLEAN COUSINS HANS AND WOLFGANG KRANEWITTER IN 1630, relates the story of the cousins Hans Kranewitter and Wolfgang Kranebitter who received a coat-of-arms in recogonition of service rendered to the Austrian crown in its struggle in the neighboring Engadin region in Switzerland. The Kranewitter coat-of-arms was obtained in 1950 by Richard M. Krannawitter (1909-1991) while he was in Germany with the judge Advocate office at the end of WWII. The relationship between the original Volga-German settler Johannes Krannewitter and the cousins Hans and Wolfgang Kranewitter is unknown. (See figure 28.)
Chapter 11, MAPS PF FORMER AND PRESENT PLACES OF RESIDENCE OF KRANNAWITTER FAMILIES IN GERMANY, RUSSIA, THE U.S., CANADA, AND ARGENTINA, includes 13 maps displaying the former and current homes of Krannewitter/Kranewitter/Krannawitter/Kronewitter/Kronewitt famileis in Europe, Asia, North America, and South America. These maps, which are taken from a variety of sources show the historical migration of the family from the original home in Germany, to the lower Volga River valley of Russia, to other parts of the former Soviet Union, and to the colonies centered in Ellis County, Kansas; entre Rios, Argentina; and Alberta, Canada. (See figures 29-35.)
Chapter Twelve, PHOTOGRGRAPHS OF KRANNAWITTER DESCENDANTS IN THE U.S., CANADA, ARGENTINA, RUSSIA, GERMANY, contains photographs of some of the Krannawitter/Kronewitt/Kranewitter families and individuals that migrated from the Volga-German colonies to the U.S., Canada, and Argentina. Other photographs are of descendants of these same families living in the U.S., Canada, Argentina, and Russia. (See figures 36-58).
The BIBLIOGRAPHY LIST is an alphabetical arrangement of every source used to compile this book. The list includes books, booklets, Magazine articles, Internet Websites, death records, publiched and unpublished family histories, private correspondence, census, and other records.
The last section of this book is a surname index which consists of an alphabetical list of the surname Krannawitter have already been discussed in this introduction. The reader will notice that in many instances in this book there are also several spellings for certain given names--for example, Catherine, Catharine, Catharina, Katharina, Catalina, etc. The reason for this is that each given name is presented as it was spelled in the record that it was extracted from, as are the surnames.

To make matters worse, from 1773 to 1775 Emyliano Pugachev and his followers staged a rebellion against Catherine. They also encouraged the Kirghiz to stage a rebellion of their own. Intensifying raids against the German settlements. Large areas of the Volga colonists were devastated. Some of Pugachev's followers, including about 100 Germans recruited from other Volga colnies, entered the town of Katherinenstadt, where they harassed and robbed the inhabitants of horses and guns. Katherinenstadt, the largest of the Volga colonists on the Wiesenseite, was only about five miles southwest of Obermonjou. Amid all these tragediest, men totally unaccustomed to the figors of farming were forced to learn that trade. Crop failures in the early years added to the colonists' desperation (Walters 1982; Beratz 1914).
After two genrations of colonists had lived and died, conditions for the German settlers along the lower Volga slowly began to improve. They eventually prevailed and prospered. As the original Mother Colonies became too crowded, Daughter Colonies were established. Fortunately, the colony of Obermonjou was never attacked by Kirghiz or by Pugachev's rebels. In 1767, 299 people (82 families) had founded Obermonjou. Two years later, the population was 324 (91 families). By 1798, when the first comprehensive census of Obermonjou was taken, the population had grown to 429. Through the 19th century, the population steadily increased as living conditions improved. But the good times were soon to end (Walters 1982; Beratz 1914).




The number of Volga Germans that remained in what later became the Volga German Republic increased to around 600,000 in 1914. In 1912, the population of Obermonjou had reached 2,882. By 1926, it had fallen to 2,157, due largely to a deadly famine that had swept through the Volga colonies, which were already devastated by crop failurees in 1920 and 1921. The previous disastrous effects of WWI and the resulting civil strife and anti-German sentiment added to the misfortunes of the German settlers. The tyrannical policies of Josef Stalin--brutally enforced by his communist cohorts, another widespread famine in 1932, the con scription of the young men of the towns into the Soviet army, and the banishment of property holders to prison camps all contributed to the steady decline of Obermonjou and the other Voga-German towns. The final blow came during WWII when the German army was approaching the Volga region. Stalin, fearing collaboration of the Volga Germans with the enemy, ordered the banishment of the entire population in August, 1941, along with the abrogation of the Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic of the Volga Germans, which had been established in 1924. Some 390,000 Volga Germans, which had been established in 1924. Some 390,000 Volga Germans were resettled in Siberia and Kazashstan (Walters 1982; Beratz 1914).
Among those people resettled wwere several Kranewitter families. The author has contacted two descendants of these families: Vladimir Kranewitter and Katherine Dreher. Their story and the story of other relatives still living in Russia and Kazakhstan aare recounted in Chapter 5, A FOCUS ON RELATED KRONEWITT FAMILIES LIVING IN CANADA AND ON RELATED KRANEWITTER FAMILIES LIVING IN ARGENTINA, RUSSIA, KAZAKHSTAN, AND GERMANY. Now that the Russian Government has eased restrictions on the Geman minority, more are trickling back to the former Volga German Republic near Savator. However, because the Russian economic situation is so bleak at the present time, many others are filling out the countless forms and submitting the endless documents necessary to emigrate to Germany. Katharina Dreher, mentioned above, and her family have joined the thousands of Volga Gemans who have returned to their motherland. (See figures 8-14.)
Chapter Six, OTHER FAMILIES WITH VARIANT SPELLINGS OF THE KRANNAWITTER SURNAME LIVING IN EURAOPE AND SOUTH AMERICA, contains statistics on the hundreds of families scatttered throughout Germany, Austria, Italy, Switxerland, France, Spain, Belgium, Luxemboug, and Paraguay who have different versions of the surname Krannawitter. These families and individuals are not obviously related to the Krannewitter couple that settled in Obermonjou, Russia, in 1767, Any concentration of families with a similar spelling of the surname is noted. Sources for this information were also telephone directories found on the internet. (See figures 15-21.)
ChaPTER sEVEN, A TRIBUTE TO WILFRED W. KRANNAWITTER (1924-1970), RADIOMAN SECOND CLASS, U.S.S. SARASOTA APA 204, WWII, IS A MEMORIAL to the author's father. Wilfred W. ("Willie") Krannawitter served in the south Pacific at the end of WWII. His ship, the Attacik Transport U.S.S. Sarasota APA 204, took part in the battle of WWII-- the Battle of Okinawa. This chapter includes an itineray of all the ports of call and war-time duties of the Sarasota. Also included are photographs, a history of the Sarasota's post-war activities, and an artistic rendition of the ship itself. After the war, Wilfred bought land and went into farming and stock raising. He later fought a personal battle against the neurologic disease Guillain-Barre Syndrome for 17 years before it claimed his life in 1970. (See figures 22-24).
CHAPTER EIGHT, BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF TWELVE NOTED KRANNAWITTER, KRANEWITTER, KRONEWITT, AND KRONA WITTER INDIVIDUALS IN THE U.S., CANADA, ARGENTINA, RUSSIA, AUSTRIA, GERMANY, AND AUSTRIA, contains information about the lives of eight notable Volga-German relatives: three descended from the Kronewitt family that migrated to Argentina, and one descended from one of the Kranewitter families that remained in Russia. Four unrelated but equally distinguished individuals are also treated: three with the surname Kranewitter and one with the surname Kroneawitter.
Chapter Nine, ETYMOLOGY REFERENCES AND GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATIONS IN EURAOPE AND THE U.S. THAT RELATE TO THE SURNAME KRANNAWITTER, includes entries taken from three etymological dictionaries that deal with surnames. Four geographical locations are also described: the hamlet of Kanawitt in Upper Bavaria, Germany: the mountain peak Kranabitsattel in the Hollengebirge mountains of Upper Austria, Austria; the airport Innsbruck-Kranebitten near Innsbruck, Tirol, Austria, and Kronenwetter Township in Narathon County, Wisconsin. (See figures 25-27.)
Chapter Ten, THE KRANEWITTER COAT-OF-ARMS, AWARDED TO THE TYROLEAN COUSINS HANS AND WOLFGANG KRANEWITTER IN 1630, relates the story of the cousins Hans Kranewitter and Wolfgang Kranebitter who received a coat-of-arms in recogonition of service rendered to the Austrian crown in its struggle in the neighboring Engadin region in Switzerland. The Kranewitter coat-of-arms was obtained in 1950 by Richard M. Krannawitter (1909-1991) while he was in Germany with the judge Advocate office at the end of WWII. The relationship between the original Volga-German settler Johannes Krannewitter and the cousins Hans and Wolfgang Kranewitter is unknown. (See figure 28.)
Chapter 11, MAPS PF FORMER AND PRESENT PLACES OF RESIDENCE OF KRANNAWITTER FAMILIES IN GERMANY, RUSSIA, THE U.S., CANADA, AND ARGENTINA, includes 13 maps displaying the former and current homes of Krannewitter/Kranewitter/Krannawitter/Kronewitter/Kronewitt famileis in Europe, Asia, North America, and South America. These maps, which are taken from a variety of sources show the historical migration of the family from the original home in Germany, to the lower Volga River valley of Russia, to other parts of the former Soviet Union, and to the colonies centered in Ellis County, Kansas; entre Rios, Argentina; and Alberta, Canada. (See figures 29-35.)
Chapter Twelve, PHOTOGRGRAPHS OF KRANNAWITTER DESCENDANTS IN THE U.S., CANADA, ARGENTINA, RUSSIA, GERMANY, contains photographs of some of the Krannawitter/Kronewitt/Kranewitter families and individuals that migrated from the Volga-German colonies to the U.S., Canada, and Argentina. Other photographs are of descendants of these same families living in the U.S., Canada, Argentina, and Russia. (See figures 36-58).
The BIBLIOGRAPHY LIST is an alphabetical arrangement of every source used to compile this book. The list includes books, booklets, Magazine articles, Internet Websites, death records, publiched and unpublished family histories, private correspondence, census, and other records.
The last section of this book is a surname index which consists of an alphabetical list of the surname Krannawitter have already been discussed in this introduction. The reader will notice that in many instances in this book there are also several spellings for certain given names--for example, Catherine, Catharine, Catharina, Katharina, Catalina, etc. The reason for this is that each given name is presented as it was spelled in the record that it was extracted from, as are the surnames.

Gerhard Krannewitter b. 1827, Obermonjou, Russia, m. Mrs. Gerhard (Christina) Kranewitter, be. c 1830, Russia, d. Russia. Gerhard died in Obermonjou, Russia. In the census Gerhard, 7, was listed at the house of parents Sebastian Krannewitter and Catherina (Brehm). In the 1850 Obermonjou census, gerhard, 23, was listed with his wife Christina, 21. He is referred to in an 1878 letter from Anton Boos to his son-in-law Adam Kranewitter of Valle Maria Argentina. Adam was Gerhard's brother.
children: Anna Margaret Kronewitter b. 10 Aug 1856.



Generation 1
DESCENDANTS OF JOHANNES AND ANNA ELIZABETH (SATTLER) kRANNEWITTER,
1. Johannes Krannewitter b. 1731, Weisbach,Germany, Occupation: Farmer, m. c. 1766, Elizabeth Sattler, b. c. 1738, Germany. Johannes d. c. 1782, Obermonjou, Russia. Johannes and Anna Elizabeth arrived in Obermonjou 8/3/1767. He listed his place of origin as Weisbash, Germany, and his occupation as baker. He stated that he was a Catholic. His youngest daughter Katherine was born in 1779. He was not listed in a register of Obermonjou residents compiled in 1785. This would indicate that he died sometime between 1779 and 1785. Elizabeta and Johannes died, she married Johannes Neulist. She and Johannes Neulist has no children of their own but adopted Christian Minrad (Meinrad), an orphan from Solothurn (Wittmann).
Children:
Margareta Krannewitter b. 1768
Gerhard Krannewitter b. 1770
Katherine Krannewitter b. 1779, Russia. When the 1798 census of Obermonjou was taken Katherine was living at the house of her mother Anna Elizabeth Sattler and stepfather Johannes Neulist.

Second Generation

Margareta Krannewitter b. 1768, Obermonjou, Russia m. Josef and Margareta were living at the house of Josef's mother Anna Maria Hartman, 68, and her second husband Wilhelm Seib, 53. I t was noted in the census that Josef's father was Valentin Nurberger, deceased.
children
Margareta Nurnberger b. 1794, Obermonjou, Russia.

Sebastian Krannewitter b. 7/11/1800, Obermonjou, Russia, Occupation: Farmer m. Katherine Margareta Brehm, b. c 1800 d. 11/20/1873, Russia. Sebastian died 7/11/1885, Obermonjou, Russia. In the 1834 Obermonjou census Joseph, one month old, was listed with his parents, Sebastian and Catharina (SIS) Krannewitter. In the 1850 Obermonjou census, Joseph, 16, was again listed at his parent's house. In a letter written 8/14/1878, from Anton Boos to his son-in-law Adam Krannewitter of Valle Maria, Argentian, Anton stated that Joseph was fine but that Joseph's wife had died a few weeks previously. No children were referred to in the letter.
Margaretha Krannewitter b. 1839, Obermonjou, Russia. In the 1850 Obermonjou census Maria margaretha, 11, was listed at the home of her parents Sebastian and Catherine Krannewitter. No further information is available.


Peter Kronwitter b. 1860, Obermonjou, Russia: Farmer m. c. 1880 in Obermonjou, Russia, Maria Dorothea Boos, b. 1858, Obermonjou, Russia (daughter of Anton Boos and Katherine Margaret Schreiner) d. 15-Octo1934, Volga Colonies, Russia. Peter died 2-Dec-1932, Russia. Peter and his family moved to the U.S. in 1903. After living in the U.S. for for 21 years Peter and his wife Maria Dorothea Boos returned to Obermonjou, Russia. Finding living conditions too difficult Peter and his wife attempted to return to the U.S. but got only as far as the Black Sea when Russian soldiers caught up with them and took them back to Obermonjou. In 1931 Peter was imprisoned and sent to Siberia. In 1932 he retuned to Obermonjou where he died. Maria died of starvation a few years later. He spelled his last name "Kronwitter."

Anna Margaret Kronewitter b. 10 Aug 1856, Obermonjou, Russia, m. Conrad Befort d. 12 Aug. 1914, Munjor, Ellis Cnty., K.S. Anna died 1 Aug 1923, Munjor, Ellis Cnty, KS. Anna Margaret Kronewitter Befort's death records list her father as Gerhard Kronewitter (sic) and her mother Christina, no maiden name was given. Anna Margaret and her husband Conrad Befort moved to the U.S. in 1876
children:
JERRY GENE HEART AND MARAGRET MAE (BEFORT) HEART




About Our Family Research

Place of birth for Ernest Eugene Heart: Asbury Hospital

Weight of child at birth: nine pounds, five ounces

Length of child: twenty-one inches

School: Bethel Community Play School, Cooper School, Chisolm Middle School

Second Child: June 12, 1986

Schools: Bethel Community Play School, Special Education

Place of birth: Bethel Hospital
.
Physician who delivered Michael Jeremiah Heart: Dr. Kumar, nurse practitioner: Bonnie

Tandoc

Special Interests of both sons: repairs on vehicles and motor

Church Affiliation for Margaret Mae Heart and sons: The Nazarene Church, The

Newton Christian Church

I began going back to college after 15 years at Hutchinson Community College

Jerry and Carolyn were married May 1995

Robert Eugene and Rose Heart

Children: Jerry, Cheri, Larry, Mary, Terry

Cheri married Pat (1st marriage) No children (She was 19 years old)

2nd Marriage

Cheri ____________ married Neal Upham

Occupation for Neal Upham: teacher

Children: Matthew, Jeremy and Melissa Rose

Mary Heart married Russell King

Children: Desiree and Tiffany King

Tiffany King was married in 2000 ________________________

Terry Heart married Alvin Webber

Children: 5 boys

Generation 5

Rosemary Anne Befort married Kevin Fishburn Sr

Children: Kevin Fishburn, Jr.

Date of birth: July 9, 1980

Premature birth: 5 pounds

Divorce: 1995

Rosemary Fishburn married Zane Sheiver

January 1, 2000

Bernadette Mary Mattas married Jim Bowen

Children: O

Divorce April 2000

Location: Scranton, Kansas

Licensed Foster Parents

Occupation for Jim Bowen: Postmaster

Birth date for Jim Bowen: October 24

Occupation for Bernadette Bowen: Beautician, Dog Groomer


Hammersmith/Hammerschmidt
This is the story of The Anton Hammerschmidt family. Two of the seven brothers changed their last name from Hammerschmidt to Hammersmith. One was my great grandfather, Anton Hammersmith.

Generation No. 1 ANTON HAMMERSCHMIDT
Born: Abt. 1730 in Koln, Germany. He married ? Anna? Immigration: 1767 to Remmler/Rommler Kohn Germany
Children:Johann ReinhardNikolausHeinrich(2) Anton and Wilhelmina MaryChildren:Dorotea
Immigration: 1773 to Wittmann Solothurn, Russia from Zug, RussiaAnton Hammerschmidt, b.Abt. 1730 Koln (Cologne)Married Abt. 1759 at Germany, d. Abt. 1767 at Remmler/Rommler
Other Spouses: Wilhelmina MaxWife: AnnaBorn: 1740 Abt. 1733, Germanyd. Abt. 1767 at: Remmler/Rommler
Children:Anton Hammerschmidt, born 1794 at Koln (Cologne)Spouses: Maria Eva Knoll
Johann Reinhard Hammerschmidtb. 1753 at Koln (Cologne)Spouses: ? Elizabeth Berlin
Nickolaus Hammerschmidtb. 1761 at: 1759 Koln (Cologne)m. Abt. 1872 at: Schoenchen Pani)d. Abt. 1767 at: Remmler/Rommler
Spouses: Elizabeta Meshing
HEINRICH HAMMERSCHMIDT b. Abt. 1766 Koln (Cologne) m. Abt. 1793 at Remmler/Rommlerd. Abt. 1834 at Remmler/Rommer
Spouses: Anna Katherine (Katarina) AumanLEONARD B. HAMMERSCHMIDT b. Abt. 1805 at 1808 Remmler/Rommler m. Abt. 1853, d. Abt. 1860 at: Herzog, Russia
Father: HEINRICH HAMMERSCHMIDT
Mother: KATHERINE (CATHERINE) WAHL b. Abt. 4 Oct. 1824 at Herzog, Russia, d. Abt. 13 Aug. 1900 at Victoria, Ellis County, Kansas
FATHER: IGNATIUS WAHLMOTHER: MARIA
OTHER SPOUSES: NICHOLAS SR. DREILING
CHILDREN:Name: Leonard II Hammerschmidt, b. Feb. 1854 at Herzog, (Susly) Russiam. 11 NOv. 1878 at: Russiad. 23 Sept. 1931 at Nov. 20, 1891; Victoria, Ellis County, Kansas.Spouses: Anna Maria (Susanna) Goetz, Barbara Weigel
Johannes Jacob (John) Hammerschmidt, b. November 11, 1857 at Remmler/Rommler, Russia, m. November 11, 1878 at Herzog, Kansas, d. 30 Jan 1947 at Walker, Kansas
Spouses: Anna Barbara QuintElizabeth Bieker
Leonard HammerschmidthII b. 1854 Herzog, Russia, d. Sept. 23, 1933, Victoria, Ellis County, Kansas, m. (1) Anna Maria Goetz Nov 11 1878 d. Nov. 20, 1891, Victoria, Ellis County, Kansas, b. April 25, 1865, Herzog, (Susly) Russia, d. May 13, 1942, Victoria, KansasDeparted: Herzog, Russia
Immigration: July 21, 1876, Arrived in New York on the SS MOSEL from Bremen
Anna Barbara Schmidtberger b. Dec. 06, 1884, d. Dec. 03, 1922, m. Anton Hammersmith, son of Johannes Hammersmith and Anna Quint. He was born April 15, 1884, d. April 09, 1935
KATHERINE WAHL and LEONARD HAMMERSMITH
Children of KATHERINE WAHL and LEONARD HAMMERSCHMIDT are:John Jacob, b. Nov 11, 1865 m. Anna Barbara Quint, b. May 21, 1858 in Louis, Russia, d. May 4, 1894,Leonard 1854, John N. Dreiling 1863
MICHAEL QUINT was born Jan. 5, 1834, m. FRANCIS SPEIES b. May 21, 1858
Children: They had six children plus one that was adopted; Wilhelm Toepher.
Marriage: 15 Apr 1901Agnes Wittman, b. 13 Aug. 1877, d. 22 Aug 1940Francisca Spies
Immigration for Johannes (Jacob) Hammerschmidt08/03/1876, Arrived in New York on the SS SUEVIA from Hamburg and Havre
NN: Wittman's Klena
Came on SS MOSEL 1876HAMMERSCHMIDT, (JOHANNAS) JACOB m ANNA BARBARA QUINT b. Nov. 11, 1857 Nov. 11, 1878 b. May 21, 1858 d. Jan. 30, 1947 d. May 4, 1894 P: Leonard Hammerschmidt P: Michael Quoint Catherine Wahl Francesca Spies Elizabeth--August 26, 1879 (m. Frank Bieker) (d. Nov. 1, 1959) Leonard--Jan. 20, 1881 (m. Margaret Bieker) (d. April 26, 1940) Anton--April 15, 1884 (m. Anna Barbara Schmidtberger) (d. April 9, 1935) Johannes Fidelis--December 10, 1885 (m. Anna Brungardt) (d. Nov. 3, 1957) Franz Joseph--Nov. 6, 1887 (m. Margaret Rupp) (d. Jan. 22, 1959) Michael--April 18, 1889 (m. Anna Sander) (d. Aug. 30, 1961) Catherine--July 24, 1892 (m. Anton Wagner) (d. May 6, 1964) m. ANNA ELIZABETH GEIST NEE BIEKER March 30, 1897 b. Sept. 8, 1875 d. Nov. 18, 1954 P: Conrad Bieker Magdalena Pfannenstiel Dorothea--Feb. 22, 1898 (d. July 5, 1899) Leo--March 30, 1899 (d. April 10, 1900) Josephine--Aug. 30, 1900 (d. Aug. 25, 1903) Mary--Jan. 23, 1902 (m. Joseph J. Dreiling) (d. Feb. 24, 1980) Clara--Aug 24, 1903 (d. Aug 27, 1903) Jacob--August 24, 1903 (d. August 25, 1903) Wendelin--Sept. 1, 1904 (m. Catherine Gassman) (d. June 27, 1972) Bonaventure--May 2, 1906 (m. Catherine Brungardt) (2) Mary Rupp Leiker nee Hertlein) Otto--Oct. 19, 1907 (m. Evelyn Windholz) (d. Jan. 16, 1984) Philomena Hilda--Feb. 13, 1909 (m. Anton Windholz) Anselm--Dec. 1, 1910 (m. Aureila Staab) (d. Feb. 15, 1975) Leo--Feb. 17, 1911 (d. Feb 20, 1911) Herman Joseph--June 23, 1912 (m. Teckla Sander) Lawrence--Oct. 26, 1913 (m. Rose Haas) Carolina Anna--May 5, 1915 (m. Edward Schrant (2) Joe Dubois) Catherine Elizabeth Geist--August 23, 1892 (m. B.J. Wagner) (d. Nov. 17, 1973) Ferdinand Geist--Sept. 5, 1894 (m. Mary Ann Dreiling) (deceased) Elizabeth Geist--Feb. 14, 1896 (m. Ray Linenberger) (d. Nov. 17, 1972) Bill Geist--April 5, 1897 (m. Lizzie May) (d. Dec. 23, 1982)
Johannes Jacob (John) Hammersmidt/Anna Barbara QuintHusband: Heinrich Hammersmidt b. 17665; 1766 Koln (Cologn m. abt 1793; Remmler/Rommler d. aft 1834; Remmler/RommlerFather: Anton Hammersmith
Mother: Anna
Wife: Anna Katheine (Katarina) Auman b. 1780; 1778, Remmler/Rommler d. aft 1834; Probably LuzernChildrenAnna Maria Hammerschmidt b. 1794Anton Hammerschmidt b. 1795; Remmler/Rommler m. 1817 d. aft 1834
Spouses: MargaretElizabeth Hammersmidt b. 1797Hammerschmidt b. abt 1800; Remmler/RommlerJohannes Hammerschmidt b. 1801; Remmler/Rommlerd. aft 1834
Spouses: Anna MargaretMichael I Hammerschmidt b. 1803; Remmler/Rommlerm. abt 1822;Remmler/Rommler d. aft 1834;Remmler/RommlerSpouses: Katherine
Leonard B. Hammerschmidt b. 1805 at 1808 Remmler/Rommler m. abt 1853 d. abt 1860; Herzog, RussiaSpouses: Katherine (Catherine) Wahl Anna KatherineJacob I Hammerschmidt b. 1807; Remmler/Rommler m. abt 1829; Russia d. aft 1834; Remmler/Rommler
Spouses: Anna MariaGeorge Hammerschmidt b. 1815; Remmler/Rommler d. aft 1834; Probably Luzern
Spouses: Anna Katherine III
Elizabeth Hammerschmidt): Johannes Jacob (John) Hammersmidt/Anna Barbara Quint By Margaret Heart -Husband: Anton Hammerschmidt b. abt 1740;abt 1730 Koln m. abt 1759; Germany d. aft 1767; Remmler/RommlerOther Spouses: Wilhelmina Marx
Wife: Anna b. 1740; Abt 1733 Germanyd. aft 1767; Remmler/Rommler
Children: Anton Hammerschmidt b. 1749; Koln (Cologne) GermanySpouses: Maria Eva KnollJohann Reinard Hammersmidt b. 1753;Koln (Cologne), Germany
Spouses: ______________ Elizabeth Berlin
Nickolaus Hammerschmidt b. 1761;1759 Koln (Cologne), Germany m. abt 1872; Schoenchen (Panin d. aft 1767; Remmler/Rommler

Row 1 (from west boundary) S. to N.
Joy, Derrell Joseph 25, Auguest 1948 - 26 Aug 1948
Vonfelt, Mary no dates
Vonfelt, Anna no dates
Vonfelt, Francis no dates
Molleker, Rose Mary 7 Dec 1922 - 9 Dec 1922
Vonfelt, Albert 9 Aug 1917
Vonfelt, Mary 12 Oct 1922
Vonfelt, Catherine 15 June 1930
Pfeifer, Eugene 24 May 1932 - 7 Jan 1933
Stecklein,m Dorothy Anna 19 Oct 1913
daughter of George and Mary
Stecklein, George 16 Feb 1894 - 31 Oct 1962
Stecklein, Mary 27 May 1895 - 9 Jan 1972

Row 2 (from west Boundary) S. to N.
Brungardt, Clarence 24 Sept 1921 - 7 Mar 1928
(son of Peter P. amd Rosa)
Pfeifer, William James 17 Jul 1938 - 10 Jan 1939
(son of Jacob and Regina)
Krentzerm Betty Lou 1944 - 1945
Pfeifer, Eugene 1945 - 1946
Steckline, Esdore Paul 29 May 1915 - 11 Sept 1974

Row 3 (from west Boundary) (S. to N.)
Vonfelt, Peter E. 18 Mar 1894 - 7 Mar 1971
Vomfelt, Amelia 15 Jul 1899 - 23 Apr 1923

Row 4 (from west Boundary) (S. to N.)
Fisher, Edwin
(Son of Zacheus and Monica)

Row 5 (from west boundary) (S. to N.)
Steckline, Anna 8 Nov 1916 - 5 Oct 1918
Steckline, Victor 15 May 1918 - 12 Aug 1919
(daughter and son of George and Mary)
Steckline, Katherine 1832 - 1904
Geist, Anna 24, May 19915 - 7 Jan 1917
(daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Geist)

Row 6 (from west Boundary) (S. to N.)
Molleker, Joseph 1956
(Infant son of Dan and Viola)

Row 7 (from west Boundary) (S. to N.)
Befort, Conrad 1931 - 1948
Brungardt, Peter
Brungardt, Katherine
Brungardt, Anton 26 Feb 1893 - 11 May 1930
Molleker, Donald Lee 15 Aug 1936 - 13 May 1948
Pfeifer, Barbara 1876 - 1959
Pfeifer, Andrew J. 1870- 1934
Row 8 (from west Boundary) (S. to N.)
Befort, John C. 1890 - 1933
Befort, Barbara 1893 - 1941
Brungardt, Rosa 17 Aug 1890 - 5 Oct 1925
Brungardt, Peter 4 Nov 1891 - 17 Nov 1951
Geist, Regina 1913 - 1918
Geist, Paul 1917 - 1918
Geist, Agnes 1915 - 1918
Geist, Alexander 1865 - 1918
Geist, Catherine 1873 - 1918
Vonfelt, Elizabeth 28 Oct 1892 - 9 Jun 1918
Vonfelt, John 9 Mar 1894 - 16 Oct 1967




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