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Brashear(s) Books still available, some containing Beshears
Posted by: Charles Brashear (ID *****0446) Date: September 01, 2004 at 06:27:35
  of 369


Plan for an 9-volume “A BRASHEAR(S) FAMILY HISTORY”

by Charles Brashear
1718 Arroyo Sierra Circle
Santa Rosa, CA 95405-7762
e-mail: brashear@mail.sdsu.edu
phone: 707/545-3903


       I am and have been for 40-something years actively engaged in research on the
Brashear(s) Family, in all its branches, in all spellings of the surname. Some years ago, Troy
Back and Leon Brashear gave me their blessing and permission to “update” their book, THE
BRASHEAR STORY, A FAMILY HISTORY, but the more data I collected, the more I realized
that this family history will never again fit into one volume, especially if you include the
amount and kind of detail that I like to include. I now have published five of a planned nine
volumes.

Vol 1. The First 200 Years of Brashear(s) in America and Some Descendants in Maryland
(this one was published in Nov 1998 and is still available at $35 for hardcover, $25 for
paperback, plus $3 postage and packaging; CA residents add 7.5% sales tax. See also
pricing schedule, below.)

Vol 2. Robert C. Brashear of North Carolina and Some Descendants in TN, KY, MO, TX, etc.
(Published 1 Sep 1999. Available only in hardback. $35, plus $3 p&p and 7.5% CA tax, if
applicable.)

Vol 3. Robert Samuel Brashear(s) and Some Descendants in TN and KY (Published early in
2001; $40, plus $3 p&p and CA tax, if applicable.

Vol 4. Brashear(s) Families of the Ohio Valley (Published 20 April 2002. 676 pages (xx +
576) with a 59-page index, about 50 pictures, and 7 maps. $40 + $3 p&p and CA tax, if
applicable.)

Vol 5. Two Brashear(s) Families of the Lower Mississippi Valley and their Choctaw and
Other Descendants. (Published in 2002, 700 pages, including introduction, index, pictures,
maps, etc; $40 + $3p&p and CA tax, if applicable.)

Vol 6. Brashears/ Breshears Families of TN, MO, etc (including Beshears, Boshears and
Other Descendants) (This one got so big that I’m going to have to make two of it. Probably
arrive some time in 2004)

Vol 7. Brashears Families of SC, MO, IL, etc. (This one will include Scott and Campbell
Co, TN Boshears Families; William Brashears and Sarah _____ of Spartanburg, SC, and their
sons, William Brashears (m. Mary Elizabeth Clayton) of MO and Ithra Brashears (m. Hannah
Elizabeth Middleton) of Crawford Co, IL; and Jeremiah and Isaac Beshears of Christian and
Hopkins Co, KY.

Vol 8. Brashear(s) Families West of the Mississippi River (Have been collecting chapters
for this one, but it’s not very well formed yet.)

Vol 9. Brashear Additions, Corrections, Strays, and Non-Brashear(s) Families (Plenty
of stray data, and plenty of non-Brashears families; the problem is how to organize it all. And
then who would want it? Send your data anyway; I’m keeping files as if I wanted to print a
volume of miscellaneous data.)

Order published books from me: Charles Brashear, 1718 Arroyo Sierra Circle, Santa Rosa,
CA 95405-7762 (please add $3 postage and packaging for the first book, $1 each for each
additional book sent to the same address; CA residents add 7.5% sales tax). Please do not
order books that have not yet been published.


Prices are as follows; CA residents please add 7.5% sales tax:
vol. 1 (hardback): $38 ($35 + $3 p&p)
vol. 1 (paperback): $28 ($25 + $3 p&p)
vol. 2 (hardback only) $38 ($35 + $3 p&p)
. . . . . (v.1 hardback & v.2 together: $70 + $4 p&p)
vol. 3 (hardback only) $43 ($40 + $3 p&p)
. . . . . (v.1, 2, & 3 together: $100 + $5 p&p)
vol. 4 (hardback only) $43 ($40 + $3 p&p)
. . . . . (v.1 & v.4 together: $75 + $4 p&p)
vol. 5 (hardback only) $43 ($40 + $3 p&p)
. . . . . (v.1 & v.5 together: $75 + $4 p&p)
. . . . . (v.1, 2, & 5 together: $100 + $5 p&p)
. . . . . (v.1, 2, 3, 4, & 5 together: $170 + $7 p&p)
The other volumes are yet to be finished.

. . . I also have copies of A BRAZIER/BRASHER SAGA, 300 Years of the Brasher, Brazier,
Brasier, Brashier Family in America. Which is an altogether different family: Descendants
of William B. Brashier Sr, who died at age 34 in Old Baltimore Co (now Harford Co), MD in
1708, leaving four orphans, whom the courts took care of. This book is available only in
8.5"x11" paperback and sells for $28 ($25 + $3 p&p).
. . . I'm working on the other Brashear books.
To order the printed volumes (please do NOT order the volumes not yet printed!),
send a note, saying which volume(s) you want (so I won’t get confused) and where you want
it/them sent, along with a check or money order, to

Charles Brashear,
1718 Arroyo Sierra Circle,
Santa Rosa, CA 95405-7762
Phone: 707/545-3903

I’ll mail the books as soon as I can put them into the mailing boxes and get to the Post
Office.
. . . If any of you want to order a gift copy for your favorite library, I’ll knock $10 off the price
(that is, you pay $25 for the hardbacks of v.1 & v.2, $30 for the others, plus p&p), and I’ll
send it to the library in your name. Just tell me which library, or let me pick one. (Some
30 libraries already have gift copies of vol 1, not so many of the other volumes.)


MORE DETAILS

       Here are some more detailed descriptions of the contents of the printed volumes, as well
as some of my other writings:

Vol 1: THE FIRST 200 YEARS OF BRASHEAR(S) IN AMERICA
and Some Descendants in Maryland
WARNING! Don’t mistake this for something it isn’t. (Some people bought the
Brazier/Brasher book and then complained that their Brashear family was not in it; these
are two wholly different families.) This is a volume about descendants of Robert and Benois
Brasseur, French Huguenot immigrants to Virginia, c1635, whose surname was Anglicized
as Brashear. Over the years, many branches of the family added an “s” to make it
Brashears. Benois Brasseur was naturalized in Calvert Co, MD, in 1662, and became known
as Benjamin Brashear; he is the progenitor of virtually all Americans with surnames
Brashear, Brashears, Brashares, Breshear(s), Breashear(s), Broshear(s), Beshear(s),
Boshear(s), Beshires, often Brasher, Brashers, Brashier, Brashiers, sometimes Brazier, and
about 35 other spellings. Also, this volume only treats the first 200 years of the family,
mainly in Virginia and Maryland, from about 1635 to about 1835, except that the Western
Maryland chapter comes up to the last few years. I’m working on other volumes that will
bring many of the Brashear(s) lines down to more recent times.
. . . The volume is 7" by 10", 336 pages long (16 pages of front matter, including contents
and a review of the deBrassier Family of Carpentras, France; 300 pages of text (see contents
below); and 20 pages of 4-column index--about 3500 entries).

Abbreviated CONTENTS of Vol 1:
1. Robert Brasseur, The Huguenot Immigrant ........................ 1
2. Benjamin (Benois) Brassieur, The American ..................... 23
3. John Brasseur, of Nansemond Co, Virginia ..................... .50
4. Thomas Brasher, of Cecil Co, MD ................................65
5. Robert Brasheur, II, “Elder” ...................................70
6. Robert Brashier, III, The Improvident...........................77
7. Three Brothers of Maryland: Benjamin, Samuel, and Robert IV ... 92
8. Benjamin Brashear Jr and Rebecca Walker .......................121
9. John Brashear “Junior” and Mary Dowell ........................131
10. William Brashear “Senior” and Sarah Wallingsford .............156
11. Speculations About Dowell Brashears, His Family ..............169
12. Samuel Brashear Jr and Elizabeth Brashear ................... 177
13. John Brashear “Senior” and Ruth Walker .......................193
14. Hard Times in Maryland: Two Brothers Go Broke .......... .....207
15. William Brashear “Junior” and Priscilla Prather ..............215
16. William Brashears, The Millwright, and Margaret Carr .........229
17. John Brashears, III, and Mary Pottinger ................... . 241
18. Some Brashear Families of Western Maryland .................. 260
Index ............................................................301

Vol 2: ROBERT C. BRASHEAR OF NORTH CAROLINA
and Some Descendants in TN, KY, MO, TX, etc,

       The 1740s were an economically rough time in Maryland (some of our family lost their
land and/or spent time in debtors’ prison). Newly opened land in the Granville District of
North Carolina was an invitation to a new start. Three Brashear brothers--Robert C., Basil,
and Otho--migrated to NC in the late 1740s/ early 1750s, where Robert and Basil got land
grants. Basil went broke again and left about 1766, and Otho simply disappeared, but
Robert C. Brashear and his wife, Charity Dowell, stayed on and (we think) prospered. They
were patriots during the Revolutionary War, after which newly opening land in western
places beckoned again, and the family succumbed to wanderlust or land-hunger; they
became part of the American westward movement. This volume traces Robert C. Brashear
in North Carolina and the families of sons Philip, Asa, and Zaza, and daughter, Ann
(Brashear) Ball; Robert Samuel Brashear and Jesse Brashears have to wait for vol. 3 and vol.
5, respectively.
. . . The volume is 7" by 10", 316 pages (290 pages of text, about 50 illustrations, and 24
pages of 4-column index--over 4000 entries).

ABBREVIATED CONTENTS of VOL 2
Preface .......................................................... vii
1. The First Four Generations of Brashear(s) in America ............11
2. The Guilford County Brashear Colony .............................17
3. Robert C. Brashear and Charity Dowell,
       of Guilford County, NC .........................................32
4. Philip Brashears Sr and Ann Wilson of Henry Co, VA ..............47
5. Ann “Nancy” Brashears and Moses Ball of Fairfax Co, VA ..........69
6. Robert Samuel Brashears, “The Rolling Stone,”
       and Phoebe Nicks ...............................................77
7. Jesse Brashears, of Pensacola, and Elizabeth Prather ............82
8. Captain Asa Brasher and Jemima Nelson
       of Rockingham Co, NC ...........................................87
9. Zaza Brasher Sr and Elizabeth Adkinson,
       of Rockingham County, NC ......................................117
10. Zaza Brasher Sr and Elizabeth Lomax ..........................139
With Special Thanks to Joy (Hines) Horton
11. James Brashears and Nancy Bowling, of Lee Co, VA .............162
12. John Wesley B. Brashears and Drucilla ?Wilson ................183
With Special Thanks to Doyle Fenn
13. Absalom Brashears/Beshears
       and Martha Ann “Polly” Phillips ..............................218
Co-author: Jerri Beshears Kennedy
14. Robert Brashears/Beshears
       and Elizabeth Whitten, of Pike Co, MO ........................242
With Special Thanks to Larry Howser
15. Benjamin Brashears
       and Some Greene County, Missouri, Families ...................264
16. Jesse Brashears and Betsy Shell ..............................270
With Special Thanks to Darrell Spencer
Index ............................................................293

Vol 3: Robert Samuel Brashears, “The Rolling Stone,”
and Some Descendants in TN and KY.

       Very early in the Revolution (or maybe even before), several of the Guilford Co Brashear(s)
again got wanderlust, or they had worn out the land. At any rate, Robert Samuel Brashears
and all of his children migrated to the frontier, first to Sullivan Co, NC (it would become
Sullivan Co, TN), then to Roane Co, TN. RSB’s son, Isaac Brashears, went on to
Perry/Decatur Co, TN, and his son, Capt. Samuel Brashear (he dropped the “s” on his
surname), moved on to Perry Co, KY. RSB’s son, Basil, stayed on in Roane Co. This volume
is about these families.
. . . The volume is 7" x 10", 496 pages, including 41 pages of index and about 40 maps,
pictures, or other documents. Since it costed me considerably more to print this one, I have
to charge $40 per copy. Sorry.

ABBREVIATED CONTENTS OF VOL 3:

1. Robert Samuel Brashears, “The Rolling Stone,”
       And Phoebe Nicks ..............................................14
2. Philip Brashears, Son of RSB....................................35
3. Isaac Brashears, The Patriarch..................................38
4. Capt. Samuel Brashear and Margaret Eakin........................47
5. The Daughters of Robert Samuel Brashears........................59
6. Basil Brashears and Margaret “Peggy” Horton.....................92

. . . The next Six Are Children of Isaac Brashears, the Patriarch
7. John Brashears and Charity Bradley.............................116
8. Robert B. Brashears and Sarah Rhea Hankins,
. . . of Lawrence Co, Tn............................................139
9. Walter Brashears And Elizabeth Roberts.........................174
10. The Daughters of Isaac Brashears: ............................205
11. Judge Samuel Brashers And His Descendants.....................221
12. Absalom Alfred Brashears and Ellender Ross....................260

. . . The Rest Are Descendants of Capt. Samuel Brashear
13. Margaret Brashear and John Larkey.............................268
14. Sampson Brashear and Margaret Bright..........................278
15. Robert S. “Old Bob” Brashear and Mary Everidge................326
16. Two Brothers of Webster Co, Mo................................336
17. James N. Brashear Sr and Elizabeth Young......................342
18. Eli Brashear and Sarah “Sally” Campbell.......................346
19. Robert S. Brashear and Sarah “Sally” Hall.....................357
20. Adeline Brashear and Robert S. Cornett........................399
21. James N. Brashear Jr and Elizabeth Pratt......................409
22. Sampson Brashear and Mary Ann Hall............................431
24. (Rev.) William E. Brashear
       and Mary Hampton/ Fanny Elkins................................440
25. Elizabeth Brashear and Benjamin Engle.........................452
Index.............................................................455


Vol 4. Brashear(s) Families of the Ohio Valley

       Well before the Revolution, a burgeoning population made new land necessary. If you
have a family of 12 children, there is no way in the world those 12 families can live on the
same land as the parents, especially when the parents’ land is already old, nearly worn-out.
As early as the 1750s, Americans began crowding Western Maryland, the Monongahela River
valley in southwestern Pennsylvania, and by about 1775, the Ohio River Valley. A fair
number of Brashear(s) families and their relatives were among these emigrants— the Elder
and Younger William Brashears; Otho Brashear and his wife Ruth Brown (along with two of
her brothers who had married two of Otho’s sisters); Ignatius “Nacy” Brashear; Marsham
Brashear (and his father, Benjamin, and brothers, who soon moved on to Mississippi);
remnants of older Maryland families, like Lt. Rezin Brashears, Nathan Brashears/Brashares
Jr, Zachariah Brashears/Broshars; and strays like Joseph M. Brashears of Steubenville.
This volume is about these people and their families.
. . . The volume is 6" x 9", hardbound, 676 pages (xx + 656), with 59 pages of index, about
50 pictures and seven maps. $40, plus $3 postage and packaging.

ABBREVIATED CONTENTS OF VOL 4:

1. The First Five Generations..................................................1
2. Brashear Families of Western Pennsylvania...............11
3. The Brownsville Colony......................................................39
4. William Brashear and Anne Ray.......................................123
5. Marsham Brashear and Lucy Phelps
               Of Louisville......................................................................235
6. Benjamin Brashear, of Menallen Twp...................................261
7. Eden Brashear and Priscilla Gilliland............................287
8. Edward Brashear and Nancy Dyson
              And Other Kentucky Strays...............................................335
9. Ignatius "Nacy" Brashear Sr
              And Frances Permelia Catheral...............................352
10. Lt. Rezin Brashear Sr and His Four Wives............................398
11. Nathan Brashears Jr
              And His Brashares Descendants..........................................410
12. Zachariah Brashears
              And His Broshar Descendants.....................................446
13. Thomas Broshears and His Sisters........................................473
14. Samuel Mason Brashears/Broshears
               And Hannah Standiford.................................................491
15. Joseph M. Brashears and Rebecca Viers
               Of Steubenville, Oh..............................................................552
Index..................................................................................................597


Vol 5. Two Brashears Families of the Lower Mississippi Valley,
their Choctaw and other Descendants.

VOL. 5 of A BRASHEAR(S) FAMILY HISTORY, "Two Brashear(s) Families of the Lower
Mississippi Valley, Their Choctaw, & Other Descendants," 700 pages (xvi + 686) and hard
backed.$40 per copy, plus $3 postage and packaging for the first volume, $1 p&p for each
additional volume.

       Here is what this volume is about:
. . . By the late 1770s, American and European immigrants were already moving into the
lower Mississippi Valley in search of new land, even though much of that territory was under
Spanish control. Some of them came by ship to Pensacola, Mobile, New Orleans, Baton
Rouge, and Natchez, all of which were developed ports under French and Spanish
administrations. Others came by flatboat down the Cherokee (Tennessee) River, then
proceeded down an ancient, Indian trading path, soon to be known as The Natchez Trace.
Still others began floating down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to find new land.
. . . Two branches of the Brashear(s) family were among these early immigrants: 1.
Benjamin Brashear and all his children, except Marsham (who stayed in Louisville, KY) and
2. Jesse Brashears and all of his children. In both cases, one or more members of the family
married into the Choctaw tribe and founded large families that are still traceable today.
Other of their brothers and cousins founded large, non-Indian families.

Here is an abbreviated outline of the volume:
1. Benjamin Brashear and Catherine Belt of Maryland and Mississippi . . . 1
2. Capt. Richard Brashear, Soldier on the Mississippi . . . 20
3. Capt. Tobias Brashear and Martha Brocus, of "Pleasant Hill," MS . . . 35
4. R.T. "Turner" Brashear, The Choctaw Trader . . . 54
5. Jesse Brashears and Elizabeth Prather, of NC, GA, and Pensacola . . . 78
6. Philip Brashear of East Baton Rouge Parish, LA . . . 110
7. Samuel Brashears, Sr and Rachel Durant . . . 137
8. Zadock Brashears, Sr and Susannah Vaughn . . . 188
9. Jesse Brashears and Delilah Juzan, of Tombigbee . . . 223
10. The Debacle at Dancing Rabbit Creek . . . 244
11. Betsy Buckholtz's Battle for Her Entitled Land . . . 272
12. Other Squabbles With Squatters: The Reservations of Alexander Brashears, Delilah
(Juzan) Brashears, Zadock Brashears, Jr & Sr, and Turner Brashears, II . . . 309
13. The Lost And Found Reservation of Susanna (Brashears)
Stewart-Graham . . . 361
14. The Trail of Woe to Oklahoma: The Families of Delilah "Lila" Brashears and
Wesley Trahern & Vaughn Brashears and Isabella Leflore . . . 382
15. Good Times in Indian Territory: Descendants of Sophia Brashears, I, and
Sampson Moncrief . . . 427
16. The Choctaw Children of R.T. "Turner" Brashear . . . 487
17. The Dawes Disaster And American Chicanery . . . 571
Appendix— . . . 610
INDEX . . . 623



MY HISTORICAL FICTION:

       I also write fiction (mainly historical fiction about American Indians) and books about the
writing process. If any of you are interested, here are some descriptions:

Killing Cynthia Ann, a novel, published 1999 by Texas Christian University
Press. $21.50. In 1836, blonde, blue-eyed Cynthia Ann Parker was kidnaped by Comanches
in East Texas. She refused to be repatriated and lived with the Indians almost 25 years,
marrying and raising a family (Quanah Parker, last chief of the Comanches, was her oldest
son). In 1860, Texas Rangers captured Cynthia Ann and her toddler daughter, Toh-Tsee-Ah-
ne, and took them to East Texas, where her Parker relatives held her prisoner the rest of her
life. She wanted nothing but to return to her family on the Comanchería, but her Parker
relatives could not imagine why anyone would want to be an Indian. Unwittingly, they
psychologically tortured her to death. The book is a documentary novel about the last ten
years of Cynthia Ann Parker’s life. Footnotes in the margins tell the reader where the data
comes from.

Comeuppance at Kicking Horse Casino, and Other Stories, published
in 2000 by American Indian Studies Center, UCLA, $15. This collection of stories is a mix
of historical and contemporary fictions. The historical stories provide a background for the
contemporary stories, so that the entire collection becomes a loose chronicle of the Native
American experience since the European settlement of North America. A wide range of tribes
is represented--Powhatan, Cherokee, Creek, Comanche, Lakota, Navajo, Ute, Keres, Ácoma,
Zuni, and an unnamed southern California tribe. Each story highlights some individual’s
quandry--and often alienation--in negotiating and adapting to a face to face encounter with
the whites.

Brain, Brawn, and Will: The Turmoils and Adventures of Jeff Ross. Published
in 2001 by 1stbooks Library. 6x9 Paperback: $19.95. Jeff Ross was a quintessential 19th
century man. As a teenager in Tennessee, he lay on the bank of the river and watched the
Battle of Shiloh. A few years later, he rode in a vigilante party that gunned down his father’s
murderer. Thus, he learned early that violence was a socially approved way of achieving
social goals. At the same time, he went to college and graduated from Cumberland
University Law School in 1872 at the head of his class. He then embarked upon a career in
which the mind was the instrument of social progress. Thus, his personality was formed by
the twin and contradictory forces that have permeated American culture from the
beginning— violence and intellect.
. . . In 1878, at the age of 27, he ran away from his law practice and home. He traveled for
a time in New England with a circus, running a “panorama” side show and hawking a “magic
solder” for mending pots and pans. He hitch-hiked through Europe for a couple of years,
shipped for Rio de Janeiro on a Norwegian freighter, led exploring parties into the interior
of Brazil. He then took a job, running a mule team to supply railroad-building enterprises.
Soon, he had worked his way up to transportation chief, then to construction chief,
eventually to a licensed civil engineer, who actually designed and built railroads and bridges.
. . . In 1893, he got involved in the Brazilian revolution— on both sides: he sold to each,
what he had discovered from the other. When the police came looking for him, he conned
the American Consul in Rio into smuggling him out of the country. In New York, he bought
a boat-load of munitions for the Brazilian government, then hired a crew of rebels to
transport it.
. . . Back in small-town Tennessee, he became a town character, curmudgeon, and
philosopher of sorts. He once proposed that “the world” should dam Gibraltar, drain the
Mediterranean, and claim a continent of naturally irrigated farm land that would have fed
the world for many generations to come. “It would work, too,” he told a Memphis reporter in
1924, “if we had the brain, brawn, and will to accomplish it, just as the Panama Canal was
accomplished.”
. . . The book is a story of his life, told largely through his own letters, essays, fragmentary
novels, etc.

Contemporary Insanities: Short Fictions, by Charles Brashear. Published in 1990
by The Press of MacDonald & Reinecke, P.O.Box 840, Arroyo Grande, CA 93421-0840. $9.95 (mail
orders add $2 postage) ISBN 1-877947-11-3. Ask at your bookstore, or order from the publisher.
(I also have a supply of these books.)
. . . Each of these short fictions treats some aspect of everyday life that is common enough, but
from some eccentric perspective could be considered an insanity—the cruelty with which we “sane”
people treat autism; the little “itches” we torture each other with; the ego-centric, sexual fantasies
we trick ourselves with; the artifices we use to present ourselves to the world; the ogres of our
nightmares and dreams; the games we play on the young, the aged, the unusual, the famous, and
(as a nation) on each other and other nations. The theme that runs through all these fictions
makes this a coherent book, not just a collection of miscellaneous stories. Our insanities are greed,
pretensions, the exercise of privilege, the failure of our compassion and understanding, disrespect
for those who are even a little different from us, the abuse of power.



FIVE BOOKS ON WRITING
       Long-time professor of Creative Writing and author Charles Brashear has recently published
five books on writing, “The Elements of Writing” Series. For thirty years, Dr. Brashear taught
writing and literature at three universities: the University of Stockholm (on a Fulbright grant), the
University of Michigan, and San Diego State. He is now retired and devotes full time to writing,
research, and travel. This series brings his total to 20 books, including a recent novel, Killing
Cynthia Ann; a short-story collection, Comeuppance at Kicking Horse Casino; and a biography of
a remarkable 19th century man, Brain, Brawn, and Will: the Turmoils and Adventures of Jeff Ross.
. . . Among his textbooks on writing are: Creative Writing: Fiction, Drama, Poetry, the Essay
(American Book Co, 1968); The Structure of Essays (Prentice-Hall, 1973); and several on creativity
in writing.


ELEMENTS OF CREATIVITY:
On Creativity in General and Creative Writing in Particular
(No. 1 in “The Elements of Writing” Series; ISBN: 0-75963-362-2; $19.95)

“Simply the best book on the subject.” —pre-pub review
. . . “Brashear has done something amazing in pulling together so many strands in the web of creativity.”
(pre-pub review)

Elements of Creativity integrates most of what we know about the several creative
processes into one handbook. Using research in Psychology, Sociology, Philosophy,
Pedagogy, the nature of language, the creative process, and my own experience as
a writer and teacher of writing for 30 years, I've illustrated how the human mind
works while it is inventing, revising, re-envisioning, and arranging creative ideas.
Chapters 1-6, “Creativity in General,” offer a comprehensive understanding of a
complex process; chapters 7-16, “Creativity in Writing,” offer practical aspects of
creating, especially in writing, but also in business and science; chapters 17-19,
“Creativity with Others,” offer integration and connection with larger social and
philosophical issues. I haven't tried to say everything about creativity, but I have
tried to touch all the types of things there are to say.


ELEMENTS OF DIALOG, DIALECT,
and CONVERSATIONAL STYLE
(No. 2 in “The Elements of Writing” Series;
ISBN: 0-75963-372-X; $17.95)

Elements of Dialog, Dialect, and Conversational Style presents the language of talk, its structure,
style, grammar, methods of making meaning, aesthetic organization, and much
more. Different chapters derive from descriptive linguistics, non-verbal and para-
language studies, games theory and transactional analysis, social dialectology,
linguistic geography, style studies, even rhetoric. Here are the building blocks of
good familiar style. Here are the nuts and bolts, the range of possibilities, the
elements with which the languages of reports, speeches, informal essays, fiction,
poetry, plays, business and personal letters are held together.

“Many current books on writing devote a chapter or a few paragraphs to
writing dialog, but there is a lack of books zeroing in on the subject. Here, at last,
is a good one. The author’s approach is a new one, and he shows great familiarity with linguistics.
He covers the subject well, including non-verbal language, explaining how it supplements words
as part of dialog. His down-to-earth analyses and examples of dialects and accent can be quite
useful. I have never seen the subject covered so thoroughly. His arguments contrasting academic,
journalistic, and conversational style were coherent and logical.” —U.N. Tejano

“I believe this book will become at least moderately significant among publications for writers. I
would, indeed, want it in my personal library.” —U.N. Tejano



ELEMENTS OF THE NOVEL: An Update on Forster
(No. 3 in “The Elements of Writing” Series; ISBN: 0-75963-370-3; $19.95)

“ BREATH OF CLEANSING SEA-BREEZE” —Bill Baeddekker

Elements of the Novel is about the fundamental aspects of the modern novel—
story and plot; character and characterization; theme, fantasy, and prophecy;
point-of-view and belief; rhythm and pattern; aesthetic structure. It follows and
expands the scheme used by E. M. Forster in his classic Aspects of the Novel,
adding perspectives and insights that have emerged in the last seventy-odd years.
It is intended as a handbook and stimulus for people actively involved in writing novels, but would
also enrich anyone’s novel-reading experience.
. . . “Whether you think the novel is a vehicle for character study, or a vehicle for story and plot,
or for some more “poetic” elements, like aesthetic design and structure, this book is for you. The
depth of discussion at every phase is notable and rare in this sort of book. Brashear knows what
he’s talking about—and does it with clarity and economy.” —Joel Black
“Brashear is a modernist, who finds much in Post-Modernism simply nonsense. For those of us
who have resisted the waves of absurdities over the last fifty years, he’s a breath of cleansing sea-
breeze.” —Bill Baeddekker

A WRITER’S TOOLKIT: Elements of Writing Personal Essays, Poems, Stories
(No. 4 in “The Elements of Writing” Series; ISBN: 0-75963-368-1; $23.95)

       “Good book! You’ll want it on your shelf.” —Jane Wall

A Writer’s Toolkit presents the fundamental principles of creative writing and

illustrates them with both student and professional writing. Its basic strategy is

to offer samples of essays, poems, and stories by way of definition, then ask

emerging writers to develop their voices in suggested writing assignments.
The book assumes a writer should develop as many voices and tools as he/she

has things to say. It takes a modular approach to fostering writing skills in

students. It views basic techniques of writing like intellectual bricks. One has

to have the first one in place (let’s say control of image) before one can lay the

second (let’s say the manipulation of image into metaphor). One has to

understand scene and character before one can make these ingredients into a plot. However, like
a spider, writers have to be constantly attached to the far-flung foundations of their art. Writers
are doomed to be always working simultaneously on the strands and anchors of the webs they
weave.
“Every beginning writer should know what’s in this book. And every experienced writer should
be reminded of it once in a while.”—Jane Wall


ELEMENTS OF FORM AND STYLE IN EXPOSITORY ESSAYS
(No. 5 in “The Elements of Writing” Series; ISBN: 0-75963-365-7; $17.95)

“Highly recommended!” —Howard Koppolo
. . . Elements of Form and Style in Expository Essays is about the techniques of organization and
the ingredients of style in the formal, or expository, essay. It deals in detail with the three forms
of human understanding and organizing ideas— chronological sequences, classification/analysis
of component parts, and comparison/contrast, as they relate to strategies in short and longer
essays. It shows how we make sentences in English, how we make them effective and sensible, and
how they mature as we become more skilled at writing. It offers a compendium of organizational
techniques and stylistic considerations that we all grapple with as we learn to write well. It is both
process-oriented and information-rich.
. . . Strategies and styles of good writing are illustrated with both student and professional
samples. The student paragraphs and essays will show an emerging writer how others in his/her
situation have dealt with learning to write. The professional writing samples show the
sophistication we all ultimately aim toward. The book is both small enough to be usable and full
enough to be useful.

“This author makes essay writing seem simple, rather than the arduous task I remember it being.
Where was he when I needed him? And his examples, especially those on Washo and Koko, the
Ameslan “talking” chimpanzee and ape, are a treat in themselves. Highly recommended!” —Howard
Koppolo


All of the above books are currently available.

Cheers
Charles Brashear
1718 Arroyo Sierra Circle
Santa Rosa, CA 95405-7762
707/545-3903
brashear@mail.sdsu.edu



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